Our Safe Food Supply - Case Study 2
A  WebQuest for Grades 8 - 12, WebQuest Agricultural Series by Missouri Farm Bureau and Missouri State University

 

This WebQuest is intended to accompany the DVD, "Agro-Security - Safeguarding the American Food Supply."

 

 

INTRODUCTION
We Americans enjoy an abundant food supply. Everyone who is involved in agricultural production must cooperate to protect our food supply and to keep those who might seek to harm it from having success. This WebQuest is intended to cause you to think about how companies, no matter what size, may have to deal with potential dangers.


TASK
Your task is to read a Case Study and prepare a detailed set of guidelines to go with 3 different scenarios. Then as a member of a group you will prepare a brochure for the managers of the Greenest Thumb, Inc. to follow to ensure the safe storage and movement of potentially harmful chemicals.


PROCESS
Step 1: View the DVD, "Agro-Security - Safeguarding the American Food Supply," for ideas.


Step 2: Read the following Case Study.


Case Study


Greenest Thumb, Inc. is a small greenhouse equipment operation on the outskirts of a mid-size city in Mid West. The company has been in existence for more than 50 years and is currently owned by Marci and Dick Smith. In addition to designing and building greenhouses, the company also supplies materials including chemicals needed for greenhouse operations. The company employs 10 individuals who have been with the company for more than 5 years on an average.


One afternoon, the greenhouse manager, Mr. Castilo, received a phone call from a stranger asking about a job opportunity at the company. The company had recently hired two employees and had no further plans for hiring more people. Mr. Castilo explained the situation and told the caller that he should watch for any future openings in the local newspaper. Two weeks after this incident, Mr. Castilo got another call from a potential buyer asking him about the purchase of a large quantity of chemicals. The buyer particularly asked about the delivery system of the company and whether buyers themselves could pick up the chemicals during the off hours or weekends. After the 9/11 attacks, Marci and Dick had instructed all the employees to be careful about allowing unauthorized persons within the storage area of the operation. However, the company had not developed clearly written guidelines to deal with such situations. Mr. Castilo thought that the caller’s voice was uncannily similar to the voice of the person who called two weeks ago about the job opportunity. He got more suspicious about the situation. He had read in a newspaper about terrorists trying to buy or work for agricultural chemical outlets. He decided to talk to Marci and Dick immediately. After talking to the Smiths, they encouraged him to develop detailed guidelines for the employees of the company when they are faced with the situations such as: 1) job applicants 2) new suppliers and 3) buyers with unusually large orders for chemicals.


Step 3: Make a list of at least 10 detailed guidelines for the company to follow for one of the following: 1)company job applicants 2) new suppliers and 3) unusually large orders for chemicals.


Step 4: Work in groups of three assigned by teacher. Suppose you are Mr. Castilo. Prepare a brochure that Greenest Thumb, Inc. managers can follow to ensure the safe storage and movement of potentially harmful chemicals.


Step 5: Here are some Internet resources that you may use to research information to help you in completing your brochure.


1. The Department of Homeland Security has a website that provides information on various aspects of homeland security, including information relating to disasters and emergencies.


2. The Office of Domestic Preparedness is a component of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Office of State and Local Government Coordination and Preparedness (SLGCP).


3. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has a bio and food security preparedness website.


4. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) Preparedness Division provides some good information.


5. The Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides food safety education.


6. University of California, Berkeley.


7. New York State Department of Transportation, Trucking Information.


CONCLUSION
Congratulations, you now have a better understanding of the security and safety issues necessary in production. The next time you observe a production site, you should have a greater appreciation and understanding of how many steps were involved in the safe production of your food and agricultural products.


EVALUATION

Evaluation Rubric

Competency 

10 pts.

8 pts.

6 pts.

0 pts.

Guidelines

At least 10 specific guidelines for production security and safety.

At least 8 specific guidelines for production security and safety.

At least 6 specific guidelines for production security and safety.

No attempt.

Brochure

Well written with pictures or drawings explaining correct procedures in all three areas.

Some grammatical errors, with pictures or drawings explaining correct procedures in at least 2 areas.

Many grammatical errors, with a few pictures or drawings explaining correct procedures in at least 2 areas.

No attempt.



Photos courtesy of USDA NRCS.

 


This page was developed by Drs. Arbindra Rimal and Lyndon Irwin and is maintained by Missouri Farm Bureau.


Please address questions to Diane Olson at Missouri Farm Bureau.