From Egg to Chick Teacher's Page
A  WebQuest for Grades 3 - 4 (An Embryology Unit), WebQuest Agricultural Series by Missouri Farm Bureau and Missouri State University
 

INTRODUCTION

This WebQuest is intended to complement a classroom embryology project. However, realizing that some districts no longer allow embryology projects due to health or other reasons this unit may also be used in lieu of actual incubation by the use of virtual resources.

From Egg to Chick is the study of part of the life cycle of a chicken. Only birds have life cycles that begin with growth inside a hard shelled egg. Baby birds can hatch at different stages of development. When a baby Robin hatches it is naked (no feathers), is blind, cannot walk, and it's parents must feed it so it will live. A baby chick hatches with downy like feathers, is able to see, and it is able to walk, eat and drink by itself shortly after hatching.

ANSWERS:

1. Allow time for students to research the development of the chick embryo.

2. Create Graphic Organizers. This organizer is provided for students. Be sure they identify the day number of each of the 7 stages they draw and describe.

3. If your students break eggs or touch any part of the egg they must wash their hands with soap and water. The risk of salmonella is small but let's not take any chances. We suggest that only the teacher break the eggs. Label fresh egg parts . You need to print these two pages because the key will print as page 2. Then make copies of the diagram on page 1 for each student.

4. Label a 10 day old embryo. This is the answer key to the printout that students have.

5. Print these two pages about a thermometer. Make copies of the first page for students and the second page is the key.

6. Print these two pages for thermometer comparison. Make copies of the first page for students and the second page is the key.

7. The written report must use embryology terms correctly, include the importance of temperature for incubation and mention the parts of an egg.

8. Have students explain in paragraph form how similarities are the basis for classification. Distinguish between plants ( which use sunlight to make their own food) and animals (which must consume energy-rich foods). As they compare structures, be sure they include the chicken. (e.g., wings vs. fins vs. legs; gills vs. lungs; feathers vs. hair vs. scales) Then classify the animal as a vertebrate and that chickens belong to the class of birds based on their characteristics.
 

EVALUATION

Rubric For Graphic Organizer and Written Plan

Competency 
3 pts.
2 pts.
1 pts.
0 pts.
Life Cycle Graphic Organizer
Organizer includes and/or answers all the stages of the life cycle of the chicken accurately.
 Organizer includes and/or answers most of the life cycle stages accurately. Organizer includes and/or answers few life cycle stages accurately. No attempt at including life cycle stages.
Fresh Egg
Diagram uses all embryology terms appropriately. Diagram uses most embryology terms appropriately.  Embryology terms are used inappropriately. No evidence of terms. 
10-Day Old Chick Diagram uses all embryology terms appropriately. Diagram uses most embryology terms appropriately.  Embryology terms are used inappropriately. No evidence of terms. 
Read Thermometer All questions completed correctly. At least 2 questions answered correctly. Only 1 question answered correctly. No attempt.
Compare Thermometers All questions completed correctly. At least 5 questions answered correctly. At least 3 questions answered correctly. Two or fewer questions answered correctly.
Written Report Well organized, clearly written with no spelling or grammatical errors. Organized, clearly written with some spelling and/or grammatical errors. Unorganized, poorly written with numerous spelling and/or grammatical errors.  No attempt. 

Missouri's Grade-Level Expectations (GLEs)
 

COMMUNICATIONS

1 Develop and apply skills and strategies to the reading process

E Develop vocabulary by listening to and discussing unknown words in stories (ST: CA 2, 3 1.5, 1.6) (FR: I 6d, 1e, K-4)

Develop vocabulary through text, using base words , classroom resources (ST: CA 2, 3 1.5, 1.6) (FR: I 6d, 1e, K-4)

Develop vocabulary through text, using, context clues, glossary and dictionary (ST: CA 2, 3 1.5, 1.6) (FR: I 6d, 1e, K-4)

H Develop and demonstrate, with assistance, post-reading skills after reading or read-alouds to respond to text, question to clarify, retell, illustrate (ST: CA 2, 3 1.6 & 3.5) (FR: I 1e,3g,4e & f, II 1c,d,f & h, 2d K-4)

Apply post-reading skills to identify the main idea and supporting details, question to clarify, reflect, summarize, paraphrase (ST: CA 2, 3 1.6 & 3.5)

(FR: I 1e,3g,4e & f, II 1c,d,f & h, 2d K-4)

SCIENCE

Strand 3 Characteristics and Interactions of Living Organisms

1. There is a fundamental unity underlying the diversity of all living organisms.

B Organisms progress through life cycles unique to different types of organisms (K-2)

Scope and Sequence -- Life Cycles of Animals (K-2)

a. Recognize that animals progress through life cycles of birth, growth and development, reproduction, and death (K-2)

b. Record observations on the life cycle of different animals (e.g., butterfly, frog, chicken) (K-2)

c. Sequence the stages in the life cycle of animals (i.e., butterfly, frog, chicken) (K-2)

D Plants and animals have different structures that serve similar functions necessary for the survival of the organism (K-5)

Scope and Sequence -- Classification of Plants and Animals (K-5)

a. Compare structures (e.g., wings vs. fins vs. legs; gills vs. lungs; feathers vs. hair vs. scales) (K-5)

E Biological classifications are based on how organisms are related

Scope and Sequence -- Classification of Plants and Animals (K-5)

a. Explain how similarities are the basis for classification (K-5)

b. Distinguish between plants ( which use sunlight to make their own food) and animals which must consume energy- rich foods (K-5)

c. Classify animals as vertebrates or invertebrates (K-5)

d. Classify vertebrate animals into classes (amphibians, birds, reptiles, mammals, fish) based on their characteristics (K-5)

e. Identify plants or animals using simple dichotomous keys (K-5)

3. There is a genetic basis for the transfer of biological characteristics from one generation to the next through reproductive processes.

D There is heritable variation within every species of organism

Scope and Sequence -- Parent -- Offspring Relationships (K-2)

a. Recognize that living things have offspring (K-2)

b. Recognize a parent -- offspring relations based on the organisms' physical similarities and differences (K-2)

Scope and Sequence -- Life Cycles of Animals (K-2)

a. Identify and relate the similarities and differences between animal parents and their offspring (K-2)

b. Recognize similarities and differences among multiple offspring of an animal parent (K-2)

National Education Standards

ENGLISH

Communication Strategies

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purpose.

LIFE SCIENCE

Life Cycle of Organisms

  • Plants and animals have life cycles that include being born, developing into adults, reproducing, and eventually dying. The details of this life cycle are different for different organisms.
  • Plants and animals closely resemble their parents.
  • Many characteristics of an organism are inherited from the parents of the organism, but other characteristics result from an individual's interactions with the environment. Inherited characteristics include the color of flowers and the number of limbs of an animal. Other features, such as the ability to ride a bicycle, are learned through interactions with the environment and cannot be passed on to the next generation.

COMMON CORE STANDARDS
Science: Strand 7, Sec. 1D
Language Arts: Writing Sec. 6

 

RESOURCES

Graphic Organizers

It Started as an Egg


Non-fiction Books:

Blanchet, Francoise. What to do with...An Egg. New York: Barron's Woodbury, ©1979.


Eggcyclopedia. American Egg Board. 1460 Renaissance Drive, Park Ridge, IL 60068.

Garelick May. What's Inside?. New York: Scholastic Book Services,. ©1968.

Griffin, Margaret. The Amazing Egg Book. New York: Addison Wesley. ©1989.

Hariton, Anca. Egg Story. New York: Penguin Books. ©1992.

Helwig, Hans. Farm Animals. New York: Random House. ©1978.

Lauber, Patricia. What's Hatching Out of the Egg?. New York: Crown Publishers. ©1975.

Milgrom, Harry. Egg-ventures, First Science Experiments. New York: E. P. Dutton. ©1974.

Nassiet, Claude. Egg Art. New York: Drake Publishers. ©1971.

Pflug, Betsy. Egg-speriment. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott. ©1973.

Provensen, A and M. Who's In The Egg? New York: Golden Press. ©1970.

Selsam, Millicent. All About Eggs. New York: William R. Scott. ©1952.

Johnson, Sylvia. Inside an Egg. New York: Lerner Publications. (A Lerner Natural Science Book) . Reprint October, 1987.

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This page was developed by the late Barbara Irwin, reviewed by Lyndon and the late Barbara Irwin and is maintained by Missouri Farm Bureau.

 

 
Please address questions to Diane Olson at Missouri Farm Bureau.