I Scream! You Scream! We All Scream for Ice Cream!
A  WebQuest for Grades 3-5, WebQuest Agricultural Series by Missouri Farm Bureau and Missouri State University

 


INTRODUCTION
Perhaps you have heard someone say "I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream?"  This saying just reminds us of how popular ice cream really is.  Have you enjoyed a scoop of your favorite ice cream on a hot summer day or maybe you have even had the chance to make "home made" ice cream for a family gathering? Ice cream is a favorite treat not just on hot days but all year long.

Your group has been invited to be a guest on the television show "Duel of Desserts."  You need to be able to sing the praises of ice cream as the best dessert choice. You and your group will need to be able to share all you know about ice cream and to persuade the panel of judges to vote for ice cream as the Official Dessert of Summer!


OVERALL TASK
Your task is to become an expert on ice cream.  Learn facts and trivia. You will conduct a survey to find the most popular flavors. You will need to learn the history of this popular treat and how it is made. You will also have the opportunity to create and name your own flavors. You will compile all of this information in a PowerPoint presentation.  Your group must present this information to the class and you will be evaluated by your classmates.


PROCESS
The teacher will divide your class into teams. Decide as a team how to evenly divide the research and slide/chart production.  Each team member must play an active role in the presentation.

Step 1: Read and research the following resources to discover when and where ice cream was invented.   When was it introduced to the United States and early American traditions? Read to discover the myths and facts surrounding the early invention of this special treat. Who else enjoyed ice cream long ago?   Create a timeline that includes the most common origins of ice cream. Make sure that it includes a title and has at least 5 dates important to the history and/ or making of ice cream. You may include pictures, quotes, and other facts but remember to stay on topic.

Step 2.  Conduct a class survey to find your classmates' favorite flavors and  treats and different brands of ice cream. After creating a class survey,  discover your class's favorite ice cream flavors, treats or even brands.  Then graph or rank your results using a simple bar or tally chart.  Remember to include graph title, labels, and scale. (You can use Excel to construct your graph if you would like, or you might just like to draw it). Compare the national favorites with your class results.  Were they similar or different?  Write a short summary of your findings.

Step 3.  Learn about modern ice cream productiongeneral facts and trivia, and recipes and bonus information. For example, what causes ice cream headaches?   

Step 4: Research some nationally known companies to see which flavors they offer, what other treats are available and what, if anything, makes that company unique. Pay close attention to the names of the flavors. From the list below, your team will be assigned a company to investigate. Research your assigned company's operations thoroughly, by visiting its website. Then your team will create a PowerPoint presentation of at least six slides that outlines your assigned company's history and, if applicable, any significant contributions made by that company to the ice cream-making process.  If possible, provide illustrations of your company's manufacturing processes.

Make sure you turn in all data collection information, surveys, etc
 

 

Baskin-Robbins

Haagen-Dazs

 

Ben & Jerry's

Maggie Moos

 

The Marble Slab Co

Blue Bunny


Step 5: Inventor for a Day.  This is your chance to create a new flavor. (Each person will need to complete this step on their own.) You will need to design a flavor of ice cream.  You will need to write a description of your new flavor and give it a fun and interesting title (no you can't use one you already know)!  Get creative!  Be sure to include a list of main ingredients to your new creation. Think about the stuff you are putting in your flavor, where it comes from or a place that makes you think cool.  Be creative!


CONCLUSION
You have learned about the history of ice cream, where ice cream comes from, and how it is manufactured.  You've learned about our favorites and popular companies.  You've even had the opportunity to create your own sensational flavors. Yet there is much more you can learn about ice cream.  Perhaps the next time you eat an ice cream cone, it will be an entirely new experience.


EVALUATION

Rubric for Timeline Project
 

Competency 

5 pts.

4 pts.

3 pts.

2 pts.

Content Timeline  accurately describes at least 5 dates in the history of ice cream. Timeline accurately describes at least 4 dates in the history of ice cream. Timeline accurately describes at least 3 dates in the history of ice cream. Timeline  accurately describes at least 2 dates in the history of ice cream.
Readability Overall appearance of timeline is aesthetically pleasing and easy to follow. Overall appearance of timeline is somewhat pleasing and easy to follow. Timeline is relatively readable.

 

Timeline is difficult to read.

 

Mechanics Timeline contains no grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors Less than 5 grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors 5-10 grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors More than 10 grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors

 

Title and Illustrations Timeline contains creative title and includes pictures or illustrations that are appropriate for each date. Timeline contains effective title and includes pictures or illustrations that are appropriate for at least 4 dates. Timeline contains few title and includes pictures or illustrations that are appropriate for at least 3 dates. Timeline  title is missing and includes pictures or illustrations that are appropriate for at least 2 dates.


Rubric for PowerPoint
 

  8pts.

6 pts.

4 pts. 2 pts.
Teamwork

Students work together all of the time to share ideas, offer assistance, discuss, or support each others' ideas.

Students work together most of the time to share ideas, offer assistance, discuss, or support each others' ideas.

Students work together some of the time to share ideas, offer assistance, discuss, or support each others' ideas.

Students rarely work together to share ideas, offer assistance, discuss, or support each others' ideas.

Content 

Completely accurate; all facts are precise and explicit. Mostly accurate; a few inconsistencies or errors in information. Somewhat accurate; more than a few inconsistencies or errors in information.

Completely inaccurate; the facts in this project are misleading to the audience.

Organization

 

Extremely well organized; logical format that is easy to follow; flows smoothly from one idea to another and cleverly conveys ideas; the organization enhances the effectiveness of the project.

Presented in a thoughtful manner; there are signs of organization and most transitions of ideas are easy to follow, but at times ideas are unclear. Somewhat organized; ideas are not presented coherently; transitions of ideas are not always smooth, which at times distract from the project.

Choppy and confusing; format is difficult to follow; transitions of ideas are abrupt and seriously distract from the project.

Research

Goes above and beyond to research information; solicits material in addition to what is provided, brings in personal ideas and information to enhance the project; and utilizes several to make the project effective.

Does a very good job of researching; utilizes materials provided to their full potential; solicits material ; at times takes the time to find information outside of school. Uses the material provided in an acceptable manner, but does not consult many of the resources to make the project effective. Does not utilize resources effectively; does little or no fact gathering on the topic.
 

ICE CREAM TEACHER'S PAGE


CREDITS
This WebQuest was created by teachers participating in Missouri's Agriculture in the Classroom program at Missouri State University through a USDA grant.  The template on this site was adapted from a template from The WebQuest Page and the original was designed by Dr. Lyndon Irwin.  Assistance for this project was provided by Mrs. Barbara Irwin, M.S. and Mrs. Diane Olson, M.S.

Teachers are encouraged to adapt this lesson for classroom use only.  No part of this publication may be transmitted, stored, recorded or published in any form without written permission from Missouri Farm Bureau.

This page was developed by Amy Jo Estes, reviewed by Lyndon and the late Barbara Irwin and is maintained by Missouri Farm Bureau.
 
Please address questions to Diane Olson at Missouri Farm Bureau.